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Sleeping Dogs Lie 30jul10: Brian Eno

Music for Civic Recovery Centre is an ambient Installation album from British musician Brian Eno, released in 2000. An Opal release, with no catalogue number, this title is only available from EnoShop.

The music on the album is taken from an Installation – a show featuring music and visuals – that took place at the Sonic Boom exhibition of the Hayward Gallery, London, in April-June 2000. The event, featuring over 30 other artists, was curated by David Toop.

Part of Eno’s Quiet Club series of Installations, it combined 12 audio elements with 10 visual light-sculpture generative elements, which was, itself, part of a series of multi-dimensional generative music pieces using asynchronous CD players, carousel projectors and video monitors used in other Installation pieces.

In a conversation with Toop, Eno’s view is of a quiet “recovery area” situated within a city area, a theory which he has spoken of since the mid eighties; a “critically-functioning public space”, a (preferably) darkened room containing large-format screens, lots of CD players and sculptures.

Eno has said of his Installations “I want to make places that feel like music. I want to make things which are like music for the eyes. I want to extend music out into space, into the three dimensions of space, and into colour”.

The album contains only one track, which is based upon, and essentially an extended remix / melding of the tracks Ikebukuro, from his 1992 album The Shutov Assembly and Kites II & Kites III from his 1999 album Kite Stories. The heavily-treated, slowed-down vocals of the Kite Stories part are based on a Japanese ghost-story, Onmyo-Ji, by Reiko Otano and was read by Kyoko Inatome, a waitress from his favorite sushi restaurant. Eno calls this process “composting”: “so many processings and reprocessings – it’s a bit like making soup from the leftovers of the day before, which in turn was made from leftovers…”, “some earlier pieces I worked on became digested by later ones, which in turn became digested again. The technique is like composting: converting what would otherwise have been waste into nourishment”.

01 Brian Eno: “The Quiet Club” (from “Music for the Civic Recovery Centre”, 2000)

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Sleeping Dogs Lie 77: Harold Budd, Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois

pearlHearing Budd’s piano slowly fade in with the start of “Late October” is just one of those perfect moments — it’s something very distinctly him, made even more so with Eno’s touches and slight echo, and it signals the start of a fine album indeed. Acting in some respects as the understandable counterpart to Ambient 2, with the same sense of hushed, ethereal beauty the partnership brought forth on that album, The Pearl is so ridiculously good it instantly shows up much of the mainstream new age as the gloopy schlock that it often is. Eno himself is sensed as a performer on the album, if not by his absence then by his very understated presence. The merest hints of synth and whisper play around Budd’s performances, ensuring the latter takes center stage. Eno and Daniel Lanois handle the production side of things, their teamwork once again overseeing a winner. When they bring themselves a little more to the fore, it still always is in the subtlest of ways, as with the artificially higher-pitched notes from Budd on “Lost in the Humming Air.” Part of the distinct charm of the album is how the song titles perfectly capture what the music sounds like — “A Stream With Bright Fish” is almost self-defining. Another key point is how Budd truly captures what ambience in general can and does mean. “Against the Sky” is a strong example — it can be totally concentrated upon or left to play as atmospherics and is also at once both truly beautiful and not a little haunting in a disturbing sense. Other highlight tracks include the deceptively simple title track, as serene a piece of music as was ever recorded, and the closing “Still Return,” bringing The Pearl to a last peak of beauty. ~ Ned Raggett, AMG

glitterbugA clue as to the origins of Music For Glitterbug was finally gleaned in June of 1998 when Eno was interviewed in Mojo magazine: “Spinner wasn’t really a collaboration [with Jah Wobble]. I had done the soundtrack to the Derek Jarman film, Glitterbug, but didn’t think it stood up on its own as an album, without the film.”

Jarman’s last completed film while he was still alive was 1993’s Blue. Blue consists of a single shot of saturated blue colour filling the screen, as background to a soundtrack composed by Simon Fisher Turner featuring original music by Coil and other artists, where Jarman describes his life and vision.

The concept of Glitterbug was to use super 8 mm films Jarman had taken throughout his life and splice them together to tell his story. In the end, he managed to edit about an hour’s worth. This is how All Movie Guide described the hurriedly-made documentary: “It is considered to be the companion piece to Jarman’s film Blue. Without a traditional plot, the film chronicles Jarman’s life before AIDS with a series of free-flowing images gleaned from over 15 hours of Jarman’s home movies taken between the years 1970-1985. London provides the central image, but other places seen include Italy, Spain, and rural England. The glittering parties filled with drag queens, drugs, and interesting people before the onset of AIDS are also chronicled.”

Here is the original stereo mix of that soundtrack that was eventually worked over by Jah Wobble and released as Spinner after much changes – Wobble added rhythms, bass parts, and orchestra.

01 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “Late October” (04:44) from “The Pearl” (1984)
02 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “A Stream With Bright Fish” (03:57) from “The Pearl” (1984)
03 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “The Silver Ball” (03:31) from “The Pearl” (1984)
04 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “Against The Sky” (04:52) from “The Pearl” (1984)
05 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “Lost In The Humming Air” (04:21) from “The Pearl” (1984)
06 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “Dark-Eyed Sister” (04:42) from “The Pearl” (1984)
07 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “Their Memories” (02:58) from “The Pearl” (1984)
08 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “The Pearl” (03:14) from “The Pearl” (1984)
09 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “Foreshadowed” (03:52) from “The Pearl” (1984)
10 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “An Echo Of Night” (02:28) from “The Pearl” (1984)
11 Harold Budd/Brian Eno with Daniel Lanois: “Still Return” (04:12) from “The Pearl” (1984)
12 Brian Eno: “Glitterbug 08” (03:10) from “Music For Glitterbug” (1994)
13 Brian Eno: “Glitterbug 10” (03:00) from “Music For Glitterbug” (1994)
14 Brian Eno: “Glitterbug 11” (03:19) from “Music For Glitterbug” (1994)
15 Brian Eno: “Glitterbug 17” (02:05) from “Music For Glitterbug” (1994)
16 Brian Eno: “Glitterbug 18” (04:22) from “Music For Glitterbug” (1994)

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Sleeping Dogs Lie 76: Brian Eno

Music for Civic Recovery Centre is an ambient Installation album from British musician Brian Eno, released in 2000. An Opal release, with no catalogue number, this title is only available from EnoShop.

The music on the album is taken from an Installation – a show featuring music and visuals – that took place at the Sonic Boom exhibition of the Hayward Gallery, London, in April-June 2000. The event, featuring over 30 other artists, was curated by David Toop.

Part of Eno’s Quiet Club series of Installations, it combined 12 audio elements with 10 visual light-sculpture generative elements, which was, itself, part of a series of multi-dimensional generative music pieces using asynchronous CD players, carousel projectors and video monitors used in other Installation pieces.

In a conversation with Toop, Eno’s view is of a quiet “recovery area” situated within a city area, a theory which he has spoken of since the mid eighties; a “critically-functioning public space”, a (preferably) darkened room containing large-format screens, lots of CD players and sculptures.

Eno has said of his Installations “I want to make places that feel like music. I want to make things which are like music for the eyes. I want to extend music out into space, into the three dimensions of space, and into colour”.

The album contains only one track, which is based upon, and essentially an extended remix / melding of the tracks Ikebukuro, from his 1992 album The Shutov Assembly and Kites II & Kites III from his 1999 album Kite Stories. The heavily-treated, slowed-down vocals of the Kite Stories part are based on a Japanese ghost-story, Onmyo-Ji, by Reiko Otano and was read by Kyoko Inatome, a waitress from his favorite sushi restaurant. Eno calls this process “composting”: “so many processings and reprocessings – it’s a bit like making soup from the leftovers of the day before, which in turn was made from leftovers…”, “some earlier pieces I worked on became digested by later ones, which in turn became digested again. The technique is like composting: converting what would otherwise have been waste into nourishment”.

A clue as to the origins of Music For Glitterbug was finally gleaned in June of 1998 when Eno was interviewed in Mojo magazine: “Spinner wasn’t really a collaboration [with Jah Wobble]. I had done the soundtrack to the Derek Jarman film, Glitterbug, but didn’t think it stood up on its own as an album, without the film.”

Jarman’s last completed film while he was still alive was 1993’s Blue. Blue consists of a single shot of saturated blue colour filling the screen, as background to a soundtrack composed by Simon Fisher Turner featuring original music by Coil and other artists, where Jarman describes his life and vision.

The concept of Glitterbug was to use super 8 mm films Jarman had taken throughout his life and splice them together to tell his story. In the end, he managed to edit about an hour’s worth. This is how All Movie Guide described the hurriedly-made documentary: “It is considered to be the companion piece to Jarman’s film Blue. Without a traditional plot, the film chronicles Jarman’s life before AIDS with a series of free-flowing images gleaned from over 15 hours of Jarman’s home movies taken between the years 1970-1985. London provides the central image, but other places seen include Italy, Spain, and rural England. The glittering parties filled with drag queens, drugs, and interesting people before the onset of AIDS are also chronicled.”

Here is the original stereo mix of that soundtrack that was eventually worked over by Jah Wobble and released as Spinner after much changes – Wobble added rhythms, bass parts, and orchestra.

01 Brian Eno: “The Quiet Club” (20:52) from “Music for The Civic Recovery Centre” (2000)
02 Brian Eno: “Glitterbug 01” (01:13) from “Music For Glitterbug” (1994)
03 Brian Eno: “Glitterbug 02” (03:15) from “Music For Glitterbug” (1994)
04 Brian Eno: “Glitterbug 04” (04:28) from “Music For Glitterbug” (1994)
05 Brian Eno: “Glitterbug 06” (04:52) from “Music For Glitterbug” (1994)

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Sleeping Dogs Lie 75: Brian Eno

The music of this CD is a 1 hour section of a hypothetically endless piece composed and recorded by Brian Eno for his installation at the Marbe Palace, The State Russian Museum, St Petersburg, in November 1997.

The two tracks of this album, “Atmospheric Lightness” and “Chamber Lightness” are made with slowly evolving electronic layers, using the generative capabilities of the Koan Pro software. The result is a very quiet and minimal music, with beautiful harmonics created by the randomly driven polyphony. In the large room where this installation was displayed, computer-programmed projectors created randomized and colourful patterns on a series of screens, while another part of the room was dark.

This is a quiet music for a quiet times in a quiet place…

01 Brian Eno: “Atmospheric Lightness” (30:40) from “Lightness: Music for the Marble Palace” (1997)
02 Brian Eno: “Chamber Lightness” (25:00) from “Lightness: Music for the Marble Palace” (1997)

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Sleeping Dogs Lie 74: Brian Eno

This is an extremely rare album Brian Eno did (together with Daniel Lanois and Roger Eno) for library music company “Standard Music Library” for licensing music in television programs and films. Meaning, the album was purely intended for “business to business” and never commercially released for the public.

01 Brian Eno: “Soft Dawn” (2:17) from “Textures” (1989)
02 Brian Eno: “The Water Garden” (02:49) from “Textures” (1989)
03 Brian Eno: “Shaded Water” (03:15) from “Textures” (1989)
04 Brian Eno: “Suspicions” (04:10) from “Textures” (1989)
05 Brian Eno: “Ozone” (01:40) from “Textures” (1989)
06 Brian Eno: “Landscape With Haze” (04:03) from “Textures” (1989)
07 Brian Eno: “Mirage” (03:17) from “Textures” (1989)
08 Brian Eno: “River Mist” (04:32) from “Textures” (1989)
09 Brian Eno: “Constant Dreams” (03:53) from “Textures” (1989)
10 Brian Eno: “Dark Dreams” (03:05) from “Textures” (1989)
11 Brian Eno: “Black Planet” (02:50) from “Textures” (1989)
12 Brian Eno: “Night Thoughts” (03:35) from “Textures” (1989)
13 Brian Eno: “Travelers” (03:48) from “Textures” (1989)
14 Brian Eno: “Menace” (01:44) from “Textures” (1989)
15 Brian Eno: “Suspended Motion” (03:40) from “Textures” (1989)
16 Brian Eno: “The Wild” (04:21) from “Textures” (1989)
17 Brian Eno: “River Journey” (11:11) from “Textures” (1989)

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Sleeping Dogs Lie 42: Brian Eno

A collection of 18 pieces, some intended for specific films, some evidentally not, Eno’s “Music For Films” is one of his most difficult ambient records. The music contained within this disc is moody and cinematic, but its also fractured. With most the tracks less than two minutes long, ideas often do not get the chance to develop to their fullness. In “More Music For Films” most of the tracks sound very familiar, being either remixes of earlier instrumental tracks or tracks that were already released on the “Instrumentals” boxed set.

01. Brian Eno: “Aragon” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
02. Brian Eno: “From The Same Hill” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
03. Brian Eno: “Inland Sea” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
04. Brian Eno: “Two Rapid Formations” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
05. Brian Eno: “Slow Water” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
06. Brian Eno: “Sparrowfall (1)” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
07. Brian Eno: “Sparrowfall (2)” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
08. Brian Eno: “Sparrowfall (3)” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
09. Brian Eno: “Alternative 3” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
10. Brian Eno: “Quartz” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
11. Brian Eno: “Events In Dense Fog” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
12. Brian Eno: “Strange Light” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
13. Brian Eno: “Final Sunset” (from “Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1978)
14. Brian Eno: “The Last Door” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
15. Brian Eno: “Fuseli” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
16. Brian Eno: “Melancholy Waltz” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
17. Brian Eno: “Northern Lights” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
18. Brian Eno: “From The Coast” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
19. Brian Eno: “Shell” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
20. Brian Eno: “Empty Landscape” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
21. Brian Eno: “The Dove” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
22. Brian Eno: “Roman Twilight” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
23. Brian Eno: “Dawn, Marshland” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
24. Brian Eno: “Climate Study” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
25. Brian Eno: “Drift Study” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
26. Brian Eno: “Approaching Taidu” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)
27. Brian Eno: “Always Returning (II)” (from “More Music For Films”, Astralwerks, 1983)

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Sleeping Dogs Lie 29: Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)

This was the second in Virgin Records’ four-volume ‘Brief History of Ambient’ series (its proper title is ‘A Brief History of Ambient, Volume Two: Imaginary Landscapes’). The first compilation had been critically and commercially successful, and this was released only a few months later; Virgin were re-releasing a lot of their back catalogue at the time, perhaps to help pay for Janet Jackson.

The compilation is restricted to releases from Virgin and its sub-labels, although this isn’t really a handicap, especially as the CDs were assembled with loving care. Whereas the first had taken a broad approach to ambient – it had Hawkwind – this is more hardcore, although the overall mood is again upbeat and mysterious. The individual tracks are, as before, interesting, and again fortunately not overlong. The booklet gives sources.

The album is essentially a re-run of the first, but purer; even the track listing is much the same (starting off with Brian Eno, Amorphous Androgynous and Tangerine Dream as before). Between them the Eno family and members of Tangerine Dream account for only six tracks this time, instead of eight (‘Mountain of Needles’, credited here to David Byrne, is from ‘My Life in the Bush of Ghosts’, a collaboration with Brian Eno). Track nine on disc two, credited to ‘The Verve’, is in fact the Verve of ‘A Northern Soul’ and latter-day hero-rock fame, although this sounds nothing like rock. Amorphous Androgynous are of course the Future Sound of London under another name. This compilation corrects a fault with the original, in that it has proper dub music.

If the compilation has a flaw, its that it has no real standout tracks, and blends into one mass. After all this time I barely remember it; the inclusion of The Grid and Bass-o-matic was a mistake, but generally its inoffensive and a little dull. The third installment in the series was a bit more leftfield, and the fourth was much darker and moodier, and is thought highly of today. This is much less essential unless you have the first and last.

01. David Sylvain: “The Healing Place” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
02. David Sylvian & Holgar Czukay: “Premonition” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
03. David Sylvian & Robert Fripp: “Bringing Down The Light” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
04. Robert Fripp: “Water Music” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
05. Robert Fripp & Brian Eno: “Wind On Water” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
06. Brian Eno: “Tal Coat” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
07. Laraaji: “The Dance, 3” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
08. Penguin Cafe Orchestra: “Wildlife” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
09. Voyager: “Arrival (Edit)” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
10. The Verve: “Endless Life” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
11. Rain Tree Crow: “New Moon at Red Deer Wallow” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)
12. The Tsinandeli Choir: “Orovela” (from “Imaginary Landscapes (Ambient Volume 2)”, Virgin Records, 1993)

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Sleeping Dogs Lie 24: Brian Eno

Arguably Eno’s most perfectly realized piece of ambience (“Neroli” certainly can qualify, as well), “Thursday Afternoon” perfectly blends his piano riffs (very similar to what Robert Wyatt did on “1/1” on “Music for Airports”) with just the right amount on synthesizer for texture and base to create a very surreal landscape. If played as Eno intended, the effect is ever greater, with wifts of it reaching your ears like a distant smell of fresh baking done next door and a breeze gently lofting some of it through the open window to your unsuspecting nose – you can subconsciously detect it, you know its there, but it doesn’t permeate your senses fully. To play this cd any other way is fine, but alters the total effect too much for it to be fully realized or enjoyed. A gem on an lp, and among my favorite Eno cds.

01. Brian Eno: “Thursday Afternoon” (from “Thursday Afternoon”, E.G. Records, 1985)

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Sleeping Dogs Lie 10: Brian Eno

If you ever wondered what ambient music is all about, you could do worse than listen to the soundtrack by Brian Eno that accompanied the stunning visuals of NASA’s Apollo missions to the moon. Created with an intoxicating mixture of acoustic and electronic, the music makes the now-classic space travel images more magical and memorable, introducing a dreamlike element to scenes of cold reality. “An Ending (Ascent)” is about as close to an actual tune as you’ll get, but, as with every track, a shining example of what ambient music reveals about itself–slowly and carefully. – Paul Clark

On Land represented a significant move away from the strategies Brian Eno had employed in earlier ambient releases such as Discreet Music and Music for Airports. Instead of using a specific process to generate music with minimal interference from the composer, he here opts for a more gestural and intuitive approach, creating dreamy pictures of some specific geographical points or evocative memories of them. It’s quite easy to imagine these works as soundtracks to mysterious footage of imprecisely glimpsed landscapes. On Land is an album that would become highly influential with the rising tide of new age composers, though few if any would capture the chilly beauty or latent romanticism that is part and parcel of Eno. The first piece, “Lizard Point,” includes an early recorded performance of Bill Laswell on bass, and one imagines that his association with Eno was a crucial factor in the ambient directions his later work would sometimes take. On Land remains a landmark event in the genre, as well as one of its high-water marks, and sounds entirely up to date 20 years after its initial release. A superb effort. – Brian Olewnick, All Music Guide

01. Brian Eno: “The Secret Place” (from “Apollo – Atmospheres & Soundtracks”, E.G. Records, 1983)
02. Brian Eno: “Matta” (from “Apollo – Atmospheres & Soundtracks”, E.G. Records, 1983)
03. Brian Eno: “Signals” (from “Apollo – Atmospheres & Soundtracks”, E.G. Records, 1983)
04. Brian Eno: “An Ending (Ascent)” (from “Apollo – Atmospheres & Soundtracks”, E.G. Records, 1983)
05. Brian Eno: “Under Stars II” (from “Apollo – Atmospheres & Soundtracks”, E.G. Records, 1983)
06. Brian Eno: “Drift” (from “Apollo – Atmospheres & Soundtracks”, E.G. Records, 1983)
07. Brian Eno: “Deep Blue Day” (from “Apollo – Atmospheres & Soundtracks”, E.G. Records, 1983)
08. Brian Eno: “Always Returning” (from “Apollo – Atmospheres & Soundtracks”, E.G. Records, 1983)
09. Brian Eno: “Stars” (from “Apollo – Atmospheres & Soundtracks”, E.G. Records, 1983)
10. Brian Eno: “Lizard Point” (from “Ambient 4 – On Land”, E.G. Records, 1982)
11. Brian Eno: “The Lost Day” (from “Ambient 4 – On Land”, E.G. Records, 1982)
12. Brian Eno: “Lantern Marsh” (from “Ambient 4 – On Land”, E.G. Records, 1982)
13. Brian Eno: “Unfamiliar Wind (Leeks Hills)” (from “Ambient 4 – On Land”, E.G. Records, 1982)

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Sleeping Dogs Lie 02: Brian Eno

One of only two major ambient works Brian Eno recorded in the ’90s – “The Shutov Assembly” being the other – “Neroli” is a single composition, 58 minutes long, that combines Eno’s concept of music designed not to be listened too attentively with the vaguely North African feel implied by the piece’s title. Written in the Phrygian mode, with flattened intervals and missing root notes that give the piece a seeming lack of tonality, “Neroli” is even more peculiarly weightless than earlier extended ambient works like “Thursday Afternoon”. Also unlike earlier ambient works, the comparatively substantial melodic content of “Neroli” rewards attentive listening as well as the piece’s intended use as environmental music. In many ways, “Neroli” is a summation of Eno’s theories of ambient music.

01. Brian Eno: “Neroli: Thinking Music Part IV” (from “Neroli”, All Saints, 1993)

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