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Atlantic Waves 16nov10: Oi! A Nova Música Brasileira! 2/2

A two-disc set looking at Brazil’s underground music scene, Oi! A Nova Musica Brasileira! (Hey! The New Brazilian Music!), shows how wide Brazilian artists are willing to spread their net for influences. Whereas the popular music in Brazil is still largely inspired by templates set in the 70s, that of mixing the homegrown styles of samba, choro and bossa nova with jazz, rock and pop, here we get a wider variety of traditional Brazilian styles such as coco, maracatú and brega as well as the Western strains of post-punk, new wave, electronica and hip-hop. It’s a continuation of the Brazilian indie scene that started in the early 90s with bands such as Nacao Zumbi and Mundo Livre S/A. The connection with that movement, set in the Northeast and known as mangue beat, is represented here by Otto, who having released four albums and having been recording for over 10 years could not be deemed ‘new’, but who seamleesly fits into this record with “Crua,” his moody riposte to an ex-lover. Further mangue beat flavours are added by China’s “Colocando Sal Nas Feridas”, a funky guitar-laden hip-hop with a chorus as propulsive as anything the Beastie Boys ever produced. Mini Box Lunar, with “Amarelasse” offer a completely different tropical twist, resulting in something that could be the soundtrack for an especially-energetic episode of Looney Tunes. It’s no surprise then that they are being compared to Os Mutantes.

There are no shortage of female singer-songwriters coming out of Sao Paulo at the moment, but Tulipa has to be one of the most inventive. “Pedrinho”, featured here, is a sparse bossa-style number with the texture and slow, unravelling effect of Juana Molina’s best compositions. Porcas Borboletas and Mombojó both show completely different sides to Brazilian music, largely eschewing the percussion and samba/bossa guitar shapes that so define much of the music. “Nome Proprio” by Porcas Borboletas is a vitriolic punk number that personally reminds me of Dutch bands De Kift and The Ex with it’s angular riffs and up-front vocals. Mombojó, on the other hand, offer something far more serene. “Justamente” could easily be a track from Phoenix’s classic “United” album; from the hushed vocals to the bouncy bass line to the infectious guitar riff and synthesizers, it ticks all the same boxes.

All of the songs mentioned so far have come from the first disc, devoted to music that fits the more band-oriented worlds of indie, pop and rock. The second disc is more of an electronic affair, showcasing some of the new electronic genres coming out of Brazil such as technobrega and electromelody, as well as interpretations of hip-hop and dub. 3namassa, joined by CéU, one of Brazil’s hottest singers write now perform the sultry acid-jazz number “Doce Guia”, which could have featured on either disc. After this is when the beats really start to roll; Catarina Dee Jah’s “Kay Fora” sounds like a modern version of Althea & Donna’s “Uptown Top Ranking”, Curumin serves up the Salt ‘n’ Pepa inspired baile funk of “Caixa Preta” and M. Takara and R. Brandão’s “Bença do Batuque” could possibly mark the start of techno hip-hop. One of the real highlights of this disc are the electromelody and technobrega songs that constitute a large part of its middle section. It’s a very primitive sound defined by an infectious computer game melody and drum machine beat, quite rightly described as the northeast’s version of Rio’s baile funk. Perhaps the best example is Maderito & Joe’s “Eletro do Maciota Light”, a song which manages to sound like Ace of Base, nu-school R ‘n’ B and a distressed morse code signal all at once. Finishing off the set are a number of trip-hop, dub and indie-tronica tracks such as Júlia Says’ beautiful “Cá”, which sounds like Italo-disco of the very highest order.

What makes this release so remarkable is not just the breadth of talent on offer, or their ability to take on a myriad of influences, but the fact that these artists manage to do this while also producing something that is distinctly theirs. With the Tropicalia movement of the 60s and Mangue Beat in the 90s Brazilian musicians have shown that it is possible to use an anthropophagical approach to making music, consuming all influences around you but crucially producing something that reflects yourself as the end result, and this is something which is thankfully mirrored on many of the tracks on this excellent release. It should also be noted that the liner notes, complete with map of where the artists come from and descriptions of different genres makes this the perfect companion for anyone hoping to get an idea of what is happening in Brazil right now. (www.soundsandcolours.com)

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Atlantic Waves 10aug10: Mara Abrantes, Fernanda Takai

Mara Abrantes was born in 1934 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and lives in Portugal since 1958.

Fernanda Takai is perhaps better known as the lead vocalist of pop rock band Pato Fu. She has also been working on a solo career since 2007. Takai was raised in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil). She is of Japanese and Portuguese descent.

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Atlantic Waves 03aug10: Music From Minas Gerais (Brazil)

The state of Minas Gerais, located on the southeast region of Brazil, has peculiar characteristics that contributed for the transformation of its music, one of the richest and most diversified of the country. The mountains, the miscegenation of many different people, the intense religious belief, the exuberance of the popular manifestations and a strong cosmopolitan vocation generates complex harmonies, mixture of rhythms, sinuous melodies, experimentations and unusual fusions.

Minas Gerais has been a cultural hotbed ever since the Clube da Esquina movement in the 1970s. The current scene is increasingly diverse, with many artists embracing genres such as rock, samba, choro, hip-hop and MPB. The Forum da Musica de Minas Gerais was formed in 2007, representing over 400 producers and artists, with the focus of bringing their music to the rest of Brazil and beyond.

COMUM (Co-Operative Society of the Music of Minas Gerais) is a non-profit organization that was created with the purpose of giving support, take out of the informality and to integrate musicians, producers and all the professionals tied to the musical productive chain of the state of Minas Gerais, and that are not linked to the major record labels. Since it was founded, on December of 2007, COMUM is establishing itself as one of the most active, creative and representative organization of the state, proposing a new approach to the commercial relation on the musical market basing on concepts of creative economy and solidarity networks. One important action in this path was the creation of a trade service bank among its partners. COMUM also integrates the Forum of Music of Minas Gerais, where it develops, in partnership with the state government of Minas Gerais and SEBRAE, a Program of Music Exportation that expects punctual actuations on the most important national and international fairs.

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Atlantic Waves 11may10: Musica do Espirito Santo, Brazil (repeat)

01 _ Banda de Congo “Mestre Honorio” _ Ajuda Eu _ 02:39 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 1 of 20
02 _ Banda de Congo Amores da Lua _ Onde Esta’ a Baleia _ 02:44 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 2 of 20
03 _ Banda de Congo Panela de Barro _ Sao Benedito _ 02:17 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 3 of 20
04 _ Congo Folclorico Sao Benedito _ Madalena _ 03:06 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 4 of 20
05 _ Congo Mirim da Ilha _ O Velho da Palmeira _ 03:21 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 5 of 20
06 _ Silvio Barbieri _ La’ _ 03:38 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 8 of 20
07 _ Forro’ Bem Tivi _ Geovanna _ 02:29 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 9 of 20
08 _ Forro’ Raiz _ Ensinando Forro’ _ 03:11 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 10 of 20
09 _ Laion _ Remexe Mexe _ 02:33 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 11 of 20
10 _ Elias Wagner _ Um Peao na Cidade _ 02:46 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 12 of 20
11 _ H2O _ Entre Amigos _ 03:34 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 17 of 20
12 _ Alvaro Gabriel _ Gosto de Voce _ 03:17 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 19 of 20
13 _ Chico Lessa _ Afundei no Raso _ 03:07 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa azul) _ 2008 _ 20 of 20
14 _ A Camarilha _ Ladrao de Bicicleta _ 03:30 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa verde) _ 2008 _ 1 of 20
15 _ Fabiano Araujo _ O Aleph _ 05:19 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa verde) _ 2008 _ 3 of 20
16 _ Fe Paschoal _ Mimica _ 02:09 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa amarela) _ 2008 _ 12 of 20
17 _ Napalma _ Sinha’ _ 04:38 _ Musica do Espirito Santo (capa amarela) _ 2008 _ 17 of 20

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Atlantic Waves 23mar10: Minas Gerais, Brazil

“Minas são muitas também na música.

A Coletânea Brasileiríssima Música de Minas no ar é uma amostra da diversidade e da complexidade do cenário musical das Minas Gerais, com seus sambas, rocks, riffs, cordas, teclas, tambores e metais.

O projeto integra o esforço da Secretaria de Estado da Cultura e do Governo do Estado em apoiar e divulgar a música mineira e marca o início das comemorações dos 30 anos da Rádio Inconfidência, que começou a operar experimentalmente em outubro de 1978 e entrou no ar, em definitivo, em fevereiro de 1979.

A partir de uma consulta feita a mais de 50 representantes da área musical, que inclui produtores, jornalistas e pesquisadores, foram selecionados 107 artistas para a coletânea. Dos sete volumes desta amostra, três CDs são dedicados aos dois mais importantes projetos surgidos na cena Independente de Belo Horizonte, o Música Independente e o Stereoteca, com shows realizados nos teatros do Palácio das Artes e da Biblioteca Pública Estadual Luiz Bessa.

O rock e o pop, os sons regionais e seus flertes urbanos, a música instrumental e sua harmonias desconcertantes e a veia mestra da música popular, conhecida como MPB, completam o diverso conteúdo musical desta coletânea nos quatro CDs restantes.

Bem vindo ao universo musical de Minas, o Estado que, também na música, é a síntese do Brasil.”

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Atlantic Waves 27oct09: LIFEM 09

The very first London International Festival of Exploratory Music (LIFEM) unites the myspace generation of musical explorers from the four corners of the globe.

Produced by Red Orange and presented in the perfect acoustics of Kings Place, LIFEM has truly exploited the incredible potential of the world-wide-web to seek the most exciting finds from the far East, the middle East, the Arctic Circle, south America and East and West Europe. LIFEM shows just what the internet can do for world music.

LIFEM has curated evenings which bring together a selection of artists from shared continents to reveal the commonality and differences between them.

The night of Gypsy, Klezmer and Ceilidh is bound to be extremely rich and diverse as the music of Les Yeux Noirs (France); Cukunft (Poland) and Monster Ceilidh Band (UK) represent three old traditions of social dance and party music culture. Kings Place’s Hall 2 presents dancefloor fillers from Brazil, where the well-loved rhythms of samba have mutated via musical technology to create exotic electronica. Daniel Peixoto brings it bang up to date with dirty, DIY electro pop with more than his slashed neon t-shirts in common with German electro-trash.

Alongside this whirlwind tour of global music, LIFEM also presents a free programme of award-winning short films making their UK debut.

www.lifem.org.uk

88 Atlantic Waves 27oct09

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Atlantic Waves 20oct09: LIFEM 09

The very first London International Festival of Exploratory Music (LIFEM) unites the myspace generation of musical explorers from the four corners of the globe.

Produced by Red Orange and presented in the perfect acoustics of Kings Place, LIFEM has truly exploited the incredible potential of the world-wide-web to seek the most exciting finds from the far East, the middle East, the Arctic Circle, south America and East and West Europe. LIFEM shows just what the internet can do for world music.

LIFEM has curated evenings which bring together a selection of artists from shared continents to reveal the commonality and differences between them.

Kings Place’s Hall 2 presents three dancefloor fillers from Brazil, where the well-loved rhythms of samba have mutated via musical technology to create exotic electronica. With a powerful political message are Coletivo Rádio Cipó community activists, and their music fuses Brazilian styles funk de morro, samba, pontos de terreiros, carimbó and batucada with hip hop, dub and electro beats. Daniel Peixoto brings it bang up to date with dirty, DIY electro pop with more than his slashed neon t-shirts in common with German electro-trash. Closing the sweaty non-stop dancing is Da Cruz and her clash of bossa, indie-rock, electro, samba, dubstep and jazz. Selected to perform at LIFEM earlier this year, Da Cruz has just been announced on the Womex 09 programme.

A classically trained pianist, Midori Hirano had engaged the industry’s curiosity well before the EP release Poet at the Piano and European tour in 2004. Organic layers of piano, strings and electronic sampling create delicate, transparent sound poems. Oorutaichi contrasts sharply with Midori’s wistfulness, producing upfront technicolour songs influenced by Tyrannosaurus Rex, Aphex Twin and Dancehall Reggae. The founder of Okimi Records, Oorutaichi’s other projects include dancehall / broken toy music duo Obakejaa (with DJ Shabu Shabu) and Urichipangoon, a 4 piece progressive folk band featuring ex-Boredoms drummer Muneomi Senju. The brilliantly monikered DJ Scotch Egg brings LIFEM to a close with his surreal set of performance DJing. Armed only with a megaphone, four Nintendo Game Boys and a mixer, his gabber and breaknoise tracks are brought to a close with the hurling of scotch eggs into the crowd.

Alongside this whirlwind tour of global music, LIFEM also presents a free programme of award-winning short films making their UK debut.

www.lifem.org.uk

87 Atlantic Waves 20oct09

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Atlantic Waves 09jun09: Brazil

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Atlantic Waves 03feb09: Brazil (4/4)

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Atlantic Waves 27jan09: Brazil (3/4)

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Atlantic Waves 20jan09: Brazil (2/4)

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Atlantic Waves 13jan09: Brazil (1/4)

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Atlantic Waves 06jan09: Finland

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Atlantic Waves 14oct08: Brazil

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Atlantic Waves 15apr08: Brazil

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